Breaking News: 4 L.A. County social workers to stand trial in horrific death of 8-year-old boy

When a county child welfare agency fails to protect a child like Gabriel, there is actually a legal mechanism available to all of us to challenge the county’s decision and bring a child at risk directly to the attention of the juvenile court.  His teacher could have filed a simple court form called the JV-210 and asked the juvenile court judge to review the county’s decision not to take protective action, see the form and details here.   The JV-210 form should be something every foster parent, teach, and child advocate knows how to use.  Next time a teacher’s or any child advocate’s concerns fall on deaf ears, ;et’s hope they know that they can file a JV-210 to ask the judge to review a county welfare agency decision.
Los Angeles Times
BREAKING NEWS ALERT
March 20, 2017

A Los Angeles County judge ruled today that four social workers should stand trial on charges of criminal negligence in the death of an 8-year-old Palmdale boy they were charged with protecting, allowing prosecutors to push ahead with a case that has sent a chill through the ranks of child protection workers nationwide..

Read the complete article here.

The voice of foster kids

 LA Times Logo150xfxJim Newton reports for the Los Angeles Times on the foster care system and why the county should include foster parents in decisions about the children in their care. Deborah Dentler discusses the grievance procedure for foster parents. Read the complete article here.

Los Angeles County foster care shortage reaches crisis level. Legal action pending to force resolution.

 

LA Times LogoA surge in demand for foster homes in L.A. County sends more children to chaotic holding rooms; the state is threatening fines. The bed shortage is especially acute for infants. California regulators have given a deadline to address the issue. A prominent non profit law firm threatens to bring legal action to force a resolution to the problem. Read the full story published in the Los Angeles Times here.

Deborah was quoted in the Los Angeles Times in June 2012

Newton: What dependency court delays do

When appearances drag on, it’s not the judges or the lawyers but the families that pay.

by Jim Newton

In the weeks since Juvenile Court Presiding Judge Michael Nash opened this county’s dependency proceedings to the press, there have been a number of revelations about a system that, until now, has been largely shielded from scrutiny. For the first time, the public is getting a broad look at the consequences of sloppy social work, the defensiveness of lawyers used to operating in secret, the agonizing decisions of judges, even the occasional happy outcome in which a family, once torn apart, is successfully reunited. Read More